Esprit Rock

Looking back on the course

Looking back on the course, I have learned how to effectively analyze my audience and distinguish and adapt my writing for that audience. I learned different ways to make documents look appealing to readers such as public advocacy ads and blogs. I used graphics and white space to effectively show the words of the documents. As the course continued, I improved on my individual writing as well as my sentence structure when I was given feedback in the beginning of the course. My thoughts about technical writing and technical documents has not changed much except for how much work needs to be put into who your audience is and how to write specifically to that audience. The assignments were challenging in their own different way. Over this course, one of the many things I learned is how to take a piece of work and determine its purpose, audience, and context. This is how I would define writing. Every assignment we were given in this class had its own purpose and audience. Writing is a form of communication within the work environment that has a formal tone. Before taking this class, I thought writing was just critical reading and then analyzing. However, how I would define writing now and how it has changed is that there are different rhetorical situations or professional rhetorical situations. It has to do with producing professional writing through drafting, revising, and editing. Writing is for the intended audience of the text and I learned that you need to adapt texts to certain audiences. In addition, I would say that writing is often in the format of paragraphs and includes headlines or subheadings which could be used to attract the attention of the audience and what the purpose of the writing is. I would not change my claims about writing as a hallmark of professionalism. I mentioned in my blog that you need to use correct grammar and communication style.