Esprit Rock

Recently

Recently, I visited the International Civil Rights Museum in downtown Greensboro, North Carolina. During this visit I felt freshly educated on different topics that I’ve heard of but did not think twice about. I learned about gruesome beatings as well as the typically known racist acts done to African Americans even here in Greensboro. The tour guide I had, I believe her name was April, was indeed very well conscious and knowledgeable about everything she spoke on and you could hear the passion in her voice as she expanded and explained everything that went on during the times of agony for African Americans.
One event that stood out to me the most, but no more than everything else, was the story of the Greensboro Four and how all four of the boys went to North Carolina A;T. This story stood out to me because prior to going to school in Greensboro, I had never heard of the Greensboro Four or even knew anything of sort happened so close to my home. It really touched my heart because back then, these young men saw faults in society and actually wanted to help make a change versus nowadays, young men see something going on and turn to social media for approval instead of just stepping up.
Another thing that stood out for me was all the different stories of young and old people that had to suffer and die just because of the color of their skin. Growing up in school, we were taught about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and how he aided in desegregation, but they never went in depth of what was going on behind the scenes of segregation. While standing in that museum and listening to everything Ms. April was saying, I was amazed because at my age, I was just finding out about new things that I felt like I should have been taught in school or at least have done outside research on. Listening and being able to visualize some of the dreadful things done to African Americans, it was difficult to hold back tears. I hope to one day revisit this museum or take a trip to another just like it to hopefully learn more about the past and present lives of African Americans.