Esprit Rock

Trust and accountability among employees are usually successful

Trust and accountability among employees are usually successful. This can only take place when top management sets the example and then builds that example into every section and unit of the nursing home. Without trust in the workplace, there will be no communication and teamwork. An environment of trust is created only when it is evident that both parties will be safe and we have each other’s best interests in mind. To ensure that trust and accountability within a team is maintained avoid acting and speaking inconsistently, seeking personal rather than shared gain, withholding information. Telling lies or half-truths and being closed mined. However, when trust is in place, each individual in the team becomes stronger, because he or she is part of an effective, cohesive group. When people trust one another, the group can achieve truly meaningful goals.
In my experiences, whenever I have placed my trust on someone, he or she makes sure that my trust is not wrongly placed. I still remember when I started at St Mary’s my bosses had that trust in me and offered the unit manager role to me and I equally trusted them, which in turn, helped me and still helping me to accomplishing my level 5 in health and social care.
Accountability means being held responsible for complete a goal or assignment. Unfortunately, the word “accountability” often signifies punishment or negative consequences. Certainly, management should not put up with poor performance and should take action when it occurs. However, when organizations use accountability only as a big stick for punishing employees, fear and anxiety permeate the work environment. Employees are afraid to try new methods or propose new ideas for fear of failure. On the other hand, if approached correctly, accountability can produce positive, valuable results.